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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
there is no drinking water. >> neil: you and i sxi can remember with katrina, big difference in variety of levels. it was the same immediate response that things were under control. the famous heck of a job brownie comment that prompted the initial view, things are under control and not so bad. then we started getting the images, we started seeing more and more. it was not under control. we're seeing the initial response on the part of president and governor christie and mayor bloomberg and governor of new jersey is still speaking to reporters in hoboken. residents who are affected in these areas, you are talking a good game but it ain't happening to me. that is when it turns the tide. what do you see happening now if this lingers much longer? >> reporter: first of all, thank you for covering this story. i have been watching other stations, they are not covering this station. a lot of americans saw the instant response, this was a storm that was dealt with and very professional and competent manner and fema and state. now, we are finding out thanks in large part that is not the case. i think a lo
. so huge. and to compare it to katrina, katrina lost more lives. we lost too many lives, but not close to katrina. but in other ways it's much more devastating than katrina. right now in new york 305,000 homes are seriously damaged or gone. kirsten showed the pictures of some of them that are just gone by fire because the water systems failed, and the wind -- then the electrical systems got shorted; fire, wind. and the, so 305,000 homes seriously damaged or gone. just in new york up to now, there are going to be more that we'll learn about because the flooding is still there in lots of the basements. these are low-lying houses. there were 214,000 total homes gone in katrina of the same level of damage. businesses, 265,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for build
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
of the group's system of levies that were installed in new orleans in the gulf coast after katrina. >> people asked about located -- katrina and the rebuilding. not smart to build on an ocean. will the flood-prone areas be redefined, and will reveal did occur outside areas? -- will the rebuilding occur outside those areas? guest: this will be a tricky question going forward. along the jersey shore, and iconic part of their coast, a huge industry for them. they are saying it needs to be rebuilt. there are other places in new york city, mayor michael bloomberg is saying that we need to reevaluate places to rebuild and make sure we move around a little bit. especially with the storm coming at a time when state and local governments are so strapped for money. that is something that is being talked about, and i think there are certain places where you can see development has increased in recent years that may have made flooding worse. this is something you hear anecdotally of the ground. talk to people on staten island where there was very bad flooding. they say 40 years ago the neighborhood ports
katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy victims. help is on the way, and that's the message sent by errol heights students and faculty. the group is on a mission to send this semi-trailer stocked withed food, blankets and other helpful items. well, i'm lynn berry. this is "early today," just your first stop of the day today on your nbc station. >>> well, a dangerous fire forced officials to evacuate an entire town. close to 1,000 people received orders to abandon their homes. a chemical fire erupted from this derailed train car and then began leaking dangerous fumes. the evacuation order is still in effect until that fire burns out. >>> all right. new images show one animal's odd connection to halloween. a massachusetts fisherman caught this female lobster last week. look there. see? scientists say the crustacean, she is half orange, she's half black. the crustacean's split coloring happens every 50 to 100 million lobsters. that orange and black is the most common color combination. interesting. >>> well, class was in session when a drunken intruder b
everything that everybody else did getting ready for it. i was -- i sat through katrina when katrina happened. so i have kind been through a little bit of this before. but this is -- what happened here the skop scope of it. i don't think we know the scope. >> the magnitude is greater than anyone has grasped yet. >> this is where we need our news media to come in. if i may we need fewer reporters standing in waist-high water seeing they are going to be blown over and more real reporting, real news. what's going on. >> i have heard that criticism. i don't agree and i will tell you why. when i see someone standing in atlantic city in the middle of a boardwalk actually in water and i agree with him. anyone man enough that thinks they should be going out for a stroll, walking a dog and looks at that and saysly stay in. >> i was looking ate and watching ali being blown around in new york city. my first thought was why is cnn trying to kill ali velshi? what did he do here? >> ali -- >> for the 2008 crash coverage. >> it is a dramatic image that fully tells the story of how big this is and how danger
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
. but things have changed, haven't they? >> the whole story really is the cold katrina that is going on up there in parts of new york and part was new jersey as you just reported. i think this has gone way beyond a happy chappy political photoop event and has become something terbelieve for a lot of people. it is almost for a moment outside of the realm of politics as they suffer through. >> i was staggered to see a poll yesterday on the david gregory show said 65 percent of the country approved the president's handlingly the storm. have a talked to the people it is impossible for me to see how someone gets high grades because they put on a jeans jacket and walk through the rubble. >> it was early on in the days of the storm, it looked like government was in control and the president was there walking around new jersey. but very quickly, this turned into a story whose headline in time government didn't work so well, didn't it? they didn't get in the water or blankets and they ran out of the gas and as for the electrical situation, it is not a katrina where it is warm outside. people are co
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
. and it reminds me of katrina, which is to say that i think that, you know, we think of the iraq war as cratering george bush's popularity, but it wasn't until katrina came along. and i think coalesce an argument that people were making which was that, you know, government had become sort of demonized by the bush white house and the republican congress and that we were seeing the potential effects of a government that couldn't respond in an emergency and that there was a substantive basis for that, for saying that we have to have a strong infrastructure. we have to be able to respond on a large scale quickly in a crisis. so i think to your point, yes. i think that is a fair argument to make right now. i think it's a little unfair that people are saying romney basically wants to abolish fema. there's a complicated debate that has a lot to do with sending responsibilities back to the states. i've heard people that romney basically wants to do away with fema. i don't think that's quite right. >> michael, there was a tweet yesterday that amused me from @lolgop who by the way everyone should follow. h
, in hurricane katrina in 2005, the team of the nypd used a helicopter to lift people who were stranded in their homes by flood water. down on staten island three people now are missing. we know that 14 people have lost their lives on staten island alone at least 54 across the area so far. as we are seeing at ground level and especially from the air, perhaps the worst physical destruction is along the jersey shore. no doubt about that. today as you saw at the top of the broadcast, president obama and new jersey governor chris christie. >> crisis makes unexpected bed fellows. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his concern and compassion for the people of our state. >> president obama returned the fair. favor. >> he has put his heart and soul in making sure that the people of new jersey bounce back better than before. >> obama and christie touring a shelter for residents who lost everything. >>. [ inaudible ] >> fema will be coordinating. >> and walking a neighborhood among the hardest hit. >> among the surprises a president not known for displaying affection showed it this day. >
did getting ready for it. actually, i was -- i sat through katrina. so i kind of have been through a little bit of this before. but this what happened here, i don't think we know the scope oist. >> i think you are right. >> this is why we need the news media to come in. we need fewer of the reporters standing in waist high water and more real reporting real news. what is really going on. >> i have heard that. i don't agree with you. when i see somebody standing there in atlantic city in the middle of the boardwalk in water, the point of him doing that, i believe, and i agree with it, is there anyone mad enough to think that they should be growing out for a stroll walking the dog and looking at that and say it what is wrong with you? >> i was watching it. and my first thought is why is cnn trying to kill ally? what did he do here? >> because it is a dram mastic image at how big this is. >> it does and it doesn't. i mean, if it saves one life isn't it worth it? >> well, yeah, but there is a lot of things that you can do on cnn to save lives. but you can do that on another show. there
, thanks. >> memories of hurricane katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy's victims. students and faculty on a mission to send a semitrailer stocked with canned foods, blankets and other item to the atlantic coast. great for them. meanwhile, hurricane sandy has left behind a trail of sadness for the lives and property lost in its wake. nbc's brian williams spent part of his childhood growing up near the beaches of the jersey shore. so yesterday he went back to assess the damage. >> reporter: in point pleasant beach, the white sands motel has been in business for 30 years. the pool is full of sand. this is what is left of one of the motel rooms. another shore landmark is jenks where cindy clous rolled out the storm in the local aquarium she runs. >> we heard this huge woosh. and within seconds the water level went from the first step up to the door knob. >> reporter: the power is still out. they're keeping the animals safe and alive with one generator. of course, it's supposed to be a little scary in here. you have the halloween decorations up. >> that
katrina tainted george bush's presidency. then isaac wiped out the first day of the republican national convention. now hurricane sandy. sandy, what kind of name is that? are you induced or a lady storm? big surprise, just when obama needs a boost, who shows up in a gender ambiguous weather system? a category 5 bi-hurricane. don't get me wrong, i don't mind you being a meteorological event but why must be so flam poiboya and in my face about it? no, i'm hurricane sandy. deal with me. >> all right. did you see this video yesterday? a 4-year-old girl in ft. collins, colorado, if you think you're sick of the presidential election, look to her reaction after a ride to her grocery store with her mom during which she listened to an mpr report about the campaign. >> because i'm tired of both obama and mitt romney. >> that's why you're crying? oh, it will be over soon, abby. okay? the election will be over soon, okay? >> okay. >> she speaks for so many. by the way, npr offered an apology to the little girl and said "only a few more days. only a few more days." here's a picture of little abigail
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
for president bush was of him hugging someone after a natural disaster. you know, the images of katrina, biggest single thing beyond the war in iraq that undermined confidence in president bush's leadership. you cannot get those images out of your head as you watch this stuff. >> except, you know what, katty kay? there is a certain appeal that i think is coming as a relief to people who are tired, who are tired of the vitriol, of the stupidity. and a politician who can work with the other side, isn't that something that in this new age of politics that's appealing? >> it's huge. and i think it's probably almost the overriding priority of whoever gets elected next tuesday is to be able to make this country governable again. and to be able to do that by bringing about a certain amount of cooperation on the things america needs to do between republicans and democrats. we saw it yesterday between chris christie and brearack oba. and it's going to be very interesting to watch today as the campaign trail resumes, whether there's a different tone. i wouldn't be surprised -- we've heard the president us
. but it's brutal. this is our version of katrina. i've been touring the south shore today in my district, and the devastation is enormous. what you're showing on your screen is typical of many areas on long island. right now the county executive is meeting with fema to set up plans as to how the recovery will take place. work is coming in from all over the country to work with lipa, to restore the power, but it's going to be a tough haul. i can say that everything that can be done is being done. over the next several days, you'll see more power being restored. this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there still people missing? there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out. a lot of people who weren't even in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yeah. for instance, long beach, which is an island 30,000, 40,000 people on the island. many of them stayed, and i was talking to several people today. and this is just anecdotal. friends of theirs who cannot find their wife or daughters or their sons, cousins, people in homes who
superstorm sandy could be among the most expensive in united states history. hurricane katrina cleanup and recovery cost merely 106 billion dollars, -- cost nearly 106 billion dollars. katie marzullo, abc7 news. >> the need is great and to help the people affected by sandy, you can text the words red cross to 90999 to donate $10 or call 1-800-red cross. or go to abc7news.com for a link to the red across website. >>> teenager accused of stealing a celebrity chef's lamborghini and shooting at two people set to race rearraignment today. a judge ruled two weeks ago there is enough evidence against 18-year-old max wade and ordered him to tan trial on various charges. police say wade stole guy fieri's lamborghini last year to impress a girl she rejected him wade is accused shooting at a car she was in with her boyfriend. >>> san leandro's ban on styrofoam takes effect today. restaurants must use compostable -- [ unintelligible ] businesses that don't comply will be given one warning. officials say they adopted the ordinance last year to protect the city's natural environment. san leandro joi
a month after the storm, katrina, on the mississippi coast, speaking with the mayor of a small town down there where for a mile inland everything was rubble. he started to tell me, our problems now are mental. walking around in this, living in this, not being able to making progress, and a lot of people had severe psychological problems. is that something that is on your mind yet? >>guest: our biggest fear right now is people are going to become anxious when it comes to getting order to their lives. the longer it takes for them to get some sort of order, the more that depression will set in because this is their life. >>shepard: certainly the we are thinning about you. what do you need down there, quickly, before we go? >>guest: electricity. that will make all the difference in the word because we have, we cannot by any food, we cannot buy gasoline and we cannot heat our home. we have gas, we have good water, we need electric. we hope, we have 10 percent of the town lit up again and we are hoping they make great progress as they normally do. that is what we need. >>shepard: we are too, m
katrina where it was failures on the part of the federal government's response. you don't have that negative aspect. you have chris christie, the most visible republican in the country. certainly according to the media one of the better liked ones. he's out there using his platform to vouch for the leadership of the democratic president. i think that makes a powerful statement to people. i think having bloomberg weigh in makes a pretty strong statement to people as well. and i think just -- it's tough to quantify this. i think it's impossible to quantify this. to me it creates this noise that's sort of in the air, in the media air, and sort of in the conversational air in this country. it creates noise that i think takes wavering voters who maybe were soft obama supporters or soft romney supporters, i could see it moving them, you know, a small share of people, but i could see it moving people toward obama making them more comfortable with the idea of re-electing him. if it's a 1% or something, small, but it's big in the context of this election. >> in the context of endorsemen
to colonel owen of the army corps of engineers who was in new orleans after hurricane katrina, and he said that new york city is a much more complex problem because these tunnels are so deep and they are so long. and the path tunnel may be even luckier, if you will, than the subway tunnels because the subway tunnels, the system that just had its 108th birthday on saturday, one day before hurricane sandy hit. some of the electrical equipment in the tunnel -- some are so old they don't know what is the affect of salt water eroding the tunnels. one thing that struck me is that governor cuomo was talking quite firmly yesterday and today about climate change and how climate change has made lower manhattan much more vulnerable to these storm surges and has made the subway system vulnerable, which is unfortunately something that what was predicted and predictable. >> well, it's also something -- i was talking to a climate change expert today. it is only going to get worse. we have seen the water rise a foot over the last 100 years but the next 100 years should be rising in an area of two three fe
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)